воскресенье, 6 ноября 2016 г.

How To Be Mindful Before The Most Hectic Time Of The Year

How To Be Mindful Before The Most Hectic Time Of The Year


How To Be Mindful Before The Most Hectic Time Of The Year


While the holidays are about time with family and friends, many don’t look forward to the season. The months of November and December are called the most hectic time of the year for a reason. You may be dealing with family drama, last minute gifts, meal planning, decorating, and travel plans. Not to mention the start of cold and flu season. It’s a lot for one plate.


Does it have to be that way? What if you didn’t buy into the negativity, kept your cool, and could still enjoy the holidays?


Here’s how to save your sanity by practicing mindfulness before the holiday insanity ensues.


1. Simplicity is bliss.


Simplicity is key when you have too much going on, from attending five different dinners to three other parties. Consider the size of your gathering. Is it easy to get everyone together, or should you just keep it small and visit others later to reduce travel stress?


Now is the time to start your own simple tradition that you enjoy. Let family come to you for a change, host a holiday dinner for your friends, or ditch the plastic tree for a rosemary bush. If hosting one large gathering, crowdsource the decorations and let everyone bring something! Simplify your holiday traditions and commitments as much as possible.


Ask family members about their favorite holiday traditions. Strip away the frills and fuss with them to create a less stressful gathering that still honors the traditions of you and your loved ones.


2. Slow down your sleigh.


Rush. Rush. Rush. Lives are busy, and that’s just how it is for everyone. You have to squeeze in as much time as possible to please everyone, right? That’s not good for your mental, emotional or physical health. You need to slow down. Keep in mind, the holidays also mean dangerous road and travel conditions as everyone rushes to their next destination.


To be safe, don’t overschedule. Since cloning yourself isn’t currently an option, spread out your commitments, and relax between visits.


Don’t eat too much, and don’t starve yourself to “make room” before you go from house to house for meals. Unfortunately, this isn’t like trick-or-treating as a child, but the idea is the same: eat small portions, change locations, and take breaks. Also, don’t forget to communicate dietary needs to relatives to be sure there will be food you can eat readily available.


Rushing around to do everything for everyone may be your nature or what’s expected, but that needs to change. When you slow down and let others do their part, you all have time to appreciate being together.


3. Stand your holiday ground.


When you don’t participate in the usual holiday rush, say no, or form your own traditions, relatives may act negatively, feel hurt, or don’t understand. Stand your ground in a firm and loving way, but remember understanding can take time.


The holidays are not fun for someone with social anxiety. It’s not that you don’t love your family, but you need to take the time to breathe. That’s healthy! Being consistent helps others to better understand what to expect. Form a plan and determine a time commitment, then honor it. Ask your loved ones to respect your needs.


Don’t make commitments that aren’t realistic or good for you. Make new plans if you have family out of state you’d prefer to visit or are going to a girlfriend’s house instead. Sometimes, you have to say no for your own sanity.


Create strong boundaries and stand your holiday ground. With some perspective and time, it will get easier for everyone.


4. Let it snow, and let it go.


When the weather is frightful, you have to be prepared. Crazy things happen and are outside of your control. Travel plans don’t work out, you overspend on your budget, or can’t find the right gift for your child. Family drama may be frightful, too. But through it all, you have to let it go.


Let it go, let it go. Alternative plans may be made, but having a clear mind and heart makes it easier to think and relax during this time of year. Do what you need to do for yourself!


5. Rest ye merry mindful one.


Take care of yourself before, during, and after the holidays to manage holiday stress. Love your body and mind, cultivate gratitude, and give yourself the little things you always wanted or don’t have time for during the holidays.


Stick to a healthy diet, and plan ahead for the heavy, unhealthy, but delicious foods your family will bring that you don’t normally eat. Indulge yourself, but be sure your family respects any dietary needs.


Move around and exercise, even if it’s a little walk after a big meal. Stick to your yoga routine, even if you have to modify it. Practice asanas or katas to keep yourself in your body and not your worried mind.


Buy yourself a present or take an extra holiday off for yourself, whether you spend it at home, go to the spa, or take a daycation.


6. This time of year doesn’t have to be hectic.


It is possible to step into the holiday season with a relaxed and optimistic mindset. There’s only so much you can control and so much that you shouldn’t. Sometimes, all you can do is breathe and let it go.


This holiday season is important for spending time with family and friends, but the rush of the season and the required commitments make you feel insane when there’s too much going on.


Remember: You can say no. You are allowed to make changes. You are allowed to form your own traditions. And don’t forget to be kind to yourself.


Happy “Mindful Holidays” to you!


Kacey is a lifestyle blogger for The Drifter Collective, an eclectic lifestyle blog that expresses various forms of style through the influence of culture and the world around us. Kacey graduated with a degree in Communications while working for a lifestyle magazine. She has been able to fully embrace herself with the knowledge of nature, the power of exploring other locations and cultures, all while portraying her love for the world through her visually pleasing, culturally embracing and inspiring posts. You can find her on Twitter, Pinterest, and Instagram


Original article and pictures take http://thedailypositive.com/mindful-hectic-time-year/ site

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